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Metro Survey Highlights Progress In Promoting Culture Of Safety

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Safety has been at the forefront of Metro concerns since a scathing federal safety audit in 2010.
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Safety has been at the forefront of Metro concerns since a scathing federal safety audit in 2010.

A survey of Metro employees finds that 85 percent feel free to to report a safety violation or concern — a key statistic as Metro works to improve their reporting system in the wake of the 2009 crash on the Red Line.

The same survey, which will be presented to the Metro board tomorrow, found that while 53 percent of workers witnessed a "safety violation or concern" in the past year, just 43 percent reported it. In addition, 83 percent of Metro employees felt adequately trained to perform their job safely.

About two-thirds of Metro employees responded to the survey.

As reported in February, the transit authority is completing a memorandum of understanding with its unionized rail workers to establish a confidential "close call" reporting system to catch potential safety hazards that would otherwise go undetected by Metro's usual safety reporting systems.

The safety of both riders and employees has been a major focus of Metro leadership. It was just under a year ago that a Metro employee was struck and pinned by a train at the Shady Grove railyard.

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