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Bombing Suspect's Widow Hires New Lawyer

Katherine Russell, the widow of Boston bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, has added an attorney experienced with terrorism cases to her legal team, according to The Associated Press.

Her lead attorney, Amato DeLuca, said Wednesday that his client has brought on New York lawyer Joshua Dratel.

DeLuca said Dratel's "unique, specialized experience will help insure that Katie can assist in the ongoing investigation in the most constructive way possible."

The AP reports that an FBI spokeswoman wouldn't comment when asked whether Russell is cooperating, but DeLuca said in a statement that his client "will continue to meet with law enforcement, as she has done for many hours over the past week."

Bloomberg reports:

"The Federal Bureau of Investigation took DNA samples from the widow on April 29, according to a U.S. official who was briefed on the probe and asked not to be identified because the case is open. Investigators have found female DNA on a bomb fragment, said the official, who cautioned that the genetic material may have come from a number of sources and that its discovery doesn't necessarily mean that more people were involved in the crime."

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The sixth season of HBO's Game of Thrones showed a real evolution in the way the show portrays women and in the season finale, several female characters ascended to power. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Glen Weldon from NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour and Greta Johnsen, host of the Nerdette podcast, about the show.
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Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

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