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Bombing Suspect's Widow Hires New Lawyer

Katherine Russell, the widow of Boston bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, has added an attorney experienced with terrorism cases to her legal team, according to The Associated Press.

Her lead attorney, Amato DeLuca, said Wednesday that his client has brought on New York lawyer Joshua Dratel.

DeLuca said Dratel's "unique, specialized experience will help insure that Katie can assist in the ongoing investigation in the most constructive way possible."

The AP reports that an FBI spokeswoman wouldn't comment when asked whether Russell is cooperating, but DeLuca said in a statement that his client "will continue to meet with law enforcement, as she has done for many hours over the past week."

Bloomberg reports:

"The Federal Bureau of Investigation took DNA samples from the widow on April 29, according to a U.S. official who was briefed on the probe and asked not to be identified because the case is open. Investigators have found female DNA on a bomb fragment, said the official, who cautioned that the genetic material may have come from a number of sources and that its discovery doesn't necessarily mean that more people were involved in the crime."

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