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Lawmakers Praise April Employment Report, But Say It's Not Enough

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Lawmakers are pleased with the addition of 165,000 jobs in April's employment report.
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Lawmakers are pleased with the addition of 165,000 jobs in April's employment report.

The better than expected jobs report is garnering praise from lawmakers in the region, but both sides of the aisle also say it shows that more can be done.

The addition of 165,000 jobs in April came as a surprise to many analysts and to many of the Monday morning quarterbacks in Congress. But an unemployment rate hovering over 7 percent still isn't good enough for lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

Can this Congress overcome the ideological gulf dividing the two parties? Don't hold your breath.

In a statement, Virginia Republican Eric Cantor, the House Majority Leader, said, "this growth is way behind our nation's potential. We must focus on job creation more than one day a month." He says excessive government regulations continue to hinder the economy. While Democrats, such as Maryland's John Delaney, say the jobs report shows Congress needs to invest more money in things like infrastructure.

With the two parties divided, analysts expect the economy to continue slowly limping along in spite of what happens on Capitol Hill.

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