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Delaware Beaches Receive Federal Funding For Post-Sandy Recovery

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Exactly six months since Superstorm Sandy ravaged the Delaware coastline, state officials announced they have received roughly $30 million in federal funding to replenish beaches this summer, just in time for the next hurricane season.

The announcement is being received as mostly fantastic news for Delaware beach towns.

It's good news that Delaware beaches, from Rehoboth to Fenwick Island, damaged and depleted by Superstorm Sandy, will be replenished and renewed. The Army Corps of Engineers plans to pump over 2 million cubic yards of sand back onto coastline to restore the waterfront to pre-Sandy size.

The bad news is the construction site setting that invariably springs up during beach replenishment could happen during the height of the summer season in order to get the beach and the dune system ready for hurricane season in the fall.

Delaware has no official timetable, but hopes to do the brunt of the work after the tourists are gone, which could make for quite an interesting September on the beaches in Delaware.

Delaware officials received $30 million to restore the state's beaches back to pre-Sandy conditions.
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