Majority of Americans Don't Think Redskins Should Change Name | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Majority of Americans Don't Think Redskins Should Change Name

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Four in five Americans don't think the Washington Redskins should change the team's name, according to a new poll by the Associated Press.

Some consider "Redskins" to be a derogatory term for Native Americans, and the team has faced a barrage of criticism for refusing to change it. Opponents recently launched a new round of legal proceedings intended to deny the team federal trademark protection, and this week a D.C. Council Member introduced a resolution calling on the team to change its name to the "Redtails."

But the poll conducted last month shows that nationally, "Redskins" still enjoys widespread support. Seventy-nine percent of Americans were in favor of keeping the name, and just 11 percent said it should be changed. Eight percent weren't sure and two percent didn't answer.

There has been a slight drop in support since a Washington Post/ABC News poll in 1992 showed 89 percent support for the team's name.

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