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D.C. Uses Zombies To Scare Kids Away From Synthetic Marijuana

D.C. is warning kids: synthetic marijuana will turn you into a zombie.
D.C. Department of Health
D.C. is warning kids: synthetic marijuana will turn you into a zombie.

In the 1980s, there was your brain, and there was your brain on drugs. Now, it's zombies that are being used to scare kids off of drugs.

Yesterday the D.C. Department of Health launched a new ad campaign aimed at encouraging D.C. teens to avoid synthetic marijuana, a popular drug that is often sold in convenience stores and gas stations as "herbal incense," "spice" or "K2." The campaign uses images of zombies to stress the negative health impacts that the drug can have; one ad shows a zombie and his date ready to go to prom with the tagline, "No One Wants to Take a Zombie to the Prom." The campaign employs various social media tools, including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

In late 2012 the D.C. Council voted to classify synthetic marijuana as a Schedule 1 narcotic, increasing penalties for its sale, possession and use. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.) hosted town hall discussions on its use, and in December she personally intervened at a gas station in Northeast D.C. that was selling a brand of synthetic marijuana. 

Synthetic marijuana is also illegal in Virginia and Maryland. Still, existing laws can be hard to enforce, as producers can alter the chemical makeup of the synthetic marijuana to avoid penalties.

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