Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi Makes Brief Court Appearance In Libya | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi Makes Brief Court Appearance In Libya

Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi, who before the revolution in Libya seemed poised to take his father's place as ruler, made a brief court appearance in Zintan today.

The Guardian reports that while Gadhafi is waiting to be tried for war crimes, he made an appearance on a totally separate case. Libya is accusing him of "conspiring to break out of his detention, in the western mountain town of Zintan, aided by a lawyer from the international criminal court (ICC), Melinda Taylor, who was herself detained by Libya for three weeks last summer."

The Guardian adds:

"Gaddafi looked lean, smiling to journalists from the dock and giving a thumbs-up during the brief hearing. Prosecutors showed a pen and a watch they say contain a secret camera and recorder which Taylor was accused of smuggling into a meeting with Gaddafi last year. The court appointed two local lawyers to represent him, adjourning the case until September.

"Libya alleges that Taylor had the items with her during a meeting in June last year. Prosecutors say they formed part of a conspiracy to organise an escape."

The BBC explains that both Libya and the ICC want to try Gadhafi. Reuters reports that the ICC will decide later this month whether to allow Libya to proceed with the case.

This is Gadhafi's second public appearance since he was arrested in November of 2011. His father, Col. Moammar Gadhafi, ruled Libya for more than 40 years. He was toppled in a revolution and he was killed in October of 2011.

Note: We adhere to AP style when it comes to spelling Gadhafi's name. Other news organizations spell it differently.

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