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D.C. Unveils New Taxicab Color Scheme

A rendering of the proposed uniform color scheme for D.C. taxicabs.
D.C. Taxicab Commission
A rendering of the proposed uniform color scheme for D.C. taxicabs.

After months of waiting and a slate of proposals that drew from across the color spectrum, the D.C. Taxicab Commission has unveiled renderings of what it wants the city's taxicabs of the future to look like: red with a grey stripe.

As part of a taxicab modernization bill passed by the D.C. Council last year, all of the city's roughly 6,500 cabs will eventually have to adopt a uniform color scheme. Late last year the commission unveiled a number of proposals, some of which drew negative responses from D.C. legislators and the public.  Earlier this year, though, the commission said it was leaning towards a red-and-grey design, drawing upon a color scheme currently used for the Circulator buses, Capital Bikeshare and—once they get rolling—the city's new streetcars.

It still may be a while before cabs have to adopt the new uniform color scheme, though—the commission will take public input on its proposal at the end of May, after which it will have to vote whether or not to formally approve the red-and-gray design. If it does so, cabs will only have to take on the new colors incrementally; it could be five years before every cab is painted the same way.

The next step in the long-running modernization plan is credit-card payment options, which are expected in late summer.


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