WAMU 88.5 : News

Progress Made In Cutting Pollutants In Chesapeake Bay

Play associated audio

The Chesapeake Bay Program says states in the bay watershed are more than a quarter of the way toward meeting goals for cutting the bay's three main pollutants by 2025.

The new federally led restoration strategy calls for cuts in nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment. The bay program says its models show that between 2009 and 2012, nitrogen pollution was cut 25 percent, phosphorus 27 percent and sediment 32 percent. Nitrogen and phosphorus feed oxygen-robbing algae blooms and sediment clouds water and covers critical species such as bay grasses and oyster beds.

The Chesapeake Bay Program coordinates bay restoration efforts among the federal government and six states in the watershed—Maryland, Virginia, West, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New York, as well as the District of Columbia.

NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
WAMU 88.5

Texas Textbooks And Teaching The Civil War And America's History Of Racial Segregation

This fall five million public school students in Texas will use textbooks that critics say misrepresent the Civil War and the nation's history of racial segregation. The battle over how the Civil War is taught in public schools.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.