FBI Asks For Public's Help In Benghazi Investigation | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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FBI Asks For Public's Help In Benghazi Investigation

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is asking the public for help in finding three individuals who were on the grounds of the U.S. mission in Benghazi, the day an attack killed four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.

"These individuals may be able to provide information to help in the investigation," the FBI said in a short release.

The grainy photographs released by the FBI appear to show three men. One of them appears to be sporting a beard, another has a shaved head and another seems to wearing a head covering. All of them appear to be carrying weapons.

The FBI asks the public to "e-mail BenghaziTips@ic.fbi.gov or submit information confidentially at https://forms.fbi.gov/benghazi-en."

As The Wall Street Journal reports this is the "first public evidence to emerge from the probe in seven months."

The paper adds:

"A U.S. law enforcement official said the men weren't accused of carrying out the attacks. Rather, the FBI hasn't been able to identify or find them after spending months of investigation and questioning of witnesses.

"Similar to the circulation of photos to find the Boston bombing suspects, the FBI's Benghazi announcement is an attempt to enlist the public's help."

NPR's Carrie Johnson reports that "Congress is gearing up for a new round of hearings on the deadly attack next week."

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