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Cracked Rail Backs Up Red Line Trains

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Delays are expected to be considerable Wednesday morning on the Red Line.
Armando Trull
Delays are expected to be considerable Wednesday morning on the Red Line.

A crack in an electrified third rail north of the NoMa-Gallaudet Metro station caused significant delays on the Red Line Wednesday morning, just in time for rush hour.

As Metro moves to repair the cracked rail, only one of two tracks was in service on the east end of the Red Line, causing single tracking between NoMa-Gallaudet and Fort Totten. Metro has since restored normal service, but residual delays are expected for the rest of the morning.

At the Rhode Island Avenue Metro station, Ms. Ellis says her commute was delayed by 40 minutes.

"I normally don't wait more than 1-2 minutes in the morning," Ellis says.

Riders elsewhere are reporting crowded platforms, packed train cars, and a general air of frustration.

Metro is advising Red Line customers that delays are likely to abound all morning, and advise riders to consider alternate travel options, like the Green Line or the Metrobus.

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