NPR : News

Filed Under:

Teen's Punch Reportedly Lands Soccer Referee In Critical Condition

A soccer referee who was reportedly punched in the face by a teenager during a game is in critical condition in a Utah hospital, four days after the incident.

After sustaining what seemed to be minor injuries, the 46-year-old official later lost consciousness — leading doctors to find "far more serious head injuries than thought," The Salt Lake City Tribune reports.

The player, 17, was said to be unhappy with a call the referee made during a Saturday morning recreational game at Eisenhower Junior High School in Taylorsville, about 10 miles southwest of downtown Salt Lake City.

After the referee gave the teen a yellow card, reserved for serious fouls, the "player reacted by turning and punching the referee, said Unified Police Lt. Justin Hoyal," reports the Deseret News.

The teenager was arrested Monday on suspicion of aggravated assault.

The Tribune says the county district attorney will "review the case and decide whether the youth could be charged as an adult. Until then, the suspect — in custody at a youth detention facility — is considered a juvenile and his identity was not being released."

More details of the official's condition are not currently available; many media reports agree that he was struck once in the head.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Examining The War On Mexican Drug Cartels, Through Film And Fiction

Two new works of art — the documentary film Cartel Land and the novel The Cartel — shine a light on the seemingly endless drug war in Mexico. John Powers says both works are bleak, but gripping.
NPR

Why Sit-Down Meals May Be Just As Unhealthful As Fast Food

Fast-food restaurants are often demonized as the epitome of unhealthfulness. But a study suggests sit-down joints may be no better when it comes to sodium, saturated fat and the risk of overeating.
WAMU 88.5

D.C. Ranks High On 'Health' Of Democracy, Though Campaign Finance Laws Lag

According to a new report, D.C. fares well in providing access to the ballot — but falls behind due to the weakness of its campaign finance laws.
WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.