New Traffic Signal Aims To Improve Pedestrian Safety In D.C. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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New Traffic Signal Aims To Improve Pedestrian Safety In D.C.

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D.C. transportation officials unveiled a new crosswalk signal to improve pedestrian safety.
Armando Trull
D.C. transportation officials unveiled a new crosswalk signal to improve pedestrian safety.

Getting across six lanes of speeding traffic on Connecticut Avenue below Chevy Chase Circle in the District could be a matter of life or death for some pedestrians.

"The cars are extremely careless in this intersection," says Evis Daum, a pedestrian in the city. "Even when they see you, they sometimes pretend not to."

Vehicles sometimes zoom up and down District roads at a very face pace, making it difficult for pedestrians attempting to use some of the crosswalks, even when it is their right of way.

In an effort to make the roads safer, D.C. transportation officials are unveiling a new crosswalk signal.

It uses high intensity red lights in the form of an inverted pyramid that will hopefully catch the attention of drivers — specifically the drivers that are speeding along the location on Connecticut Avenue near Nicholson Street NW. It is one of several crosswalks in the District that will get this new signal.

There is a laminated instruction card next to the button that activates the signal, but despite that, how to operate the device is still unclear to some people.

"I was very glad to see they were going to put lights on, but it's a little confusing because its not immediately clear how the lights are supposed to work," says Daum.

The District is hoping that in time, the signals will make the streets safer for pedestrians.

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