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Typo Holds Up Amendment To Ease Sequestration For FAA

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Planes prepare for takeoff at Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C.
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Planes prepare for takeoff at Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C.

Remember that whole read the bill movement? It seems like lawmakers gave up on that idea. In the rush to end furloughs at the FAA, lawmakers quickly cobbled together a patch before leaving town for a weeklong recess. The problem is the Senate bill has a typo that delayed its implementation.

Maryland Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen says instead of rushing to undo just part of sequestration, lawmakers should renegotiate the entire package.

"In this case, members of Congress were rushing to the airports and obviously we don't want inconveniences at airports, but we also want to make sure that kids on Head Start don't get left out, that people who are on Meals on Wheels programs don't get left out, that the National Institutes of Health doesn't get left out," says Van Hollen.

He was one of four Maryland Democrats who opposed the FAA fix in the House. Every other lawmaker in the region supported it. Van Hollen says easing sequestration for only the FAA sets a bad precedent.

"The most politically powerful constituencies win, and the less powerful, but equally important groups get left behind," he says. "And that's just no way to deal with every important issue."

The typo in question is a missing "s" to one of the words, which the Senate plans to fix in the FAA bill on Tuesday. But the agency says it's already implementing the legislation anyway.

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