Moran Argues Against Health Exchanges for Hill Staffers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Moran Argues Against Health Exchanges for Hill Staffers

Play associated audio
Starting next year lawmakers and the majority of Hill staffers are slated to move off of the normal federal health care plan and onto new insurance exchanges.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nostri-imago/3063022330/
Starting next year lawmakers and the majority of Hill staffers are slated to move off of the normal federal health care plan and onto new insurance exchanges.

Starting next year, lawmakers and the majority of Hill staffers are slated to move off of the normal federal health care plan and onto new insurance exchanges being set up under the health care law. But now some lawmakers are getting cold feet and are looking for ways to exempt low-paid Hill staffers from the exchanges.

"You know I could probably support it because I'm looking out for my staff," says Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA). "I know how hard they work."

He adds that he's not opposed to going on an insurance exchange, but argues the program was never intended to supplement existing health insurance programs, like the one provided by the government.

"The exchanges were set up for people who don't get quality, affordable health insurance," Moran told WAMU 88.5 News off the House floor.

Critics say the idea of exempting lawmakers and Hill employees from the exchanges that will soon service millions of Americans reeks of hypocrisy. Many Republicans are vowing to do all they can to stop this movement.

"It's irreconcilable with the will of the American people. The American people truly are desperate for leadership by example. This is the antithesis of this," argues Rep. Scott Rigell (R-VA).

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is trying to tamp down the debate that was started by a Politico story this week. His office denies there was ever a discussion of exempting lawmakers or their staffs from the exchanges.

NPR

Leonard Nimoy, Mr. Spock On 'Star Trek,' Dies At 83

The cause was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, his wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, told The New York Times.
NPR

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

Scientists have recovered cultivated wheat DNA from an 8,000-year-old submerged site off the British coast. The finding suggests hunter-gatherers were trading for the grain long before they grew it.
WAMU 88.5

Paycheck Politics And The Homeland Security Bill

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is blasting Republicans who claim that the department's workers can weather a temporary shutdown if Congress can't finish legislation to fund the department by the end of Friday.

NPR

Fines Remain Rare Even As Health Data Breaches Multiply

Since 2009, a federal watchdog has levied only 22 penalties against health care organizations for failing to safeguard information about patients.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.