NPR : News

Filed Under:

Violent Protests In Paris After Same-Sex Marriage Law Passes

"Clashes broke out between protesters and riot police near France's lower house of parliament late on Tuesday just hours after the country legalized gay marriage, with opponents of the law hurling projectiles at police, who responded with tear gas," France 24 reports.

From Paris, NPR correspondent Eleanor Beardsley tells our Newscast Desk that French President Francois Hollande has called for calm. He's again made the case that the new law, which gives same-sex couples the legal right to marry and to adopt, is about equality and does not take away anyone else's rights.

"But those opposing the measure," Eleanor reports, "say it destroys the family structure and is dangerous for children because it deprives them of the right to a mother and father."

They're vowing to continue raising objections to the new law, which got got the French Parliament's approval Tuesday.

France 24 adds:

"Legions of officers stayed late into the night, and a protest against the measure turned violent near the Invalides complex of museums and monuments. Protesters threw glass bottles, cans and metal bars at police, who responded with tear gas."

With the law, France is now the 14th country to make same-sex marriage legal nationwide.

According to The Pew Forum, these countries had previously legalized same-sex marriage:

-- New Zealand (in 2013)

-- Uruguay (2013)

-- Denmark (2012)

-- Argentina (2010)

-- Portugal (2010)

-- Iceland (2010)

-- Sweden (2009)

-- Norway (2009)

-- South Africa (2006)

-- Spain (2005)

-- Canada (2005)

-- Belgium (2003)

-- The Netherlands (2000)

In three other nations, same-sex marriage is legal in some jurisdictions. They are Brazil, Mexico and the U.S.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA's Underground Museum

When Noah Davis founded the museum, he wanted to bring world-class art to a neighborhood he likened to a food desert, meaning no grocery stores or museums. Davis died a year ago Monday.
NPR

The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries

Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
WAMU 88.5

State Taxes, School Budgets And The Quality Of Public Education

Budget cutbacks have made it impossible for many states to finance their public schools. But some have bucked the trend by increasing taxes and earmarking those funds for education. Taxes, spending and the quality of public education.

NPR

A Robot That Harms: When Machines Make Life Or Death Decisions

An artist has designed a robot that purposefully defies Isaac Asimov's law that "a robot may not harm humanity" — to bring urgency to the discussion about self-driving and other smart technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.