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FAA Furloughs Begin, Delays Expected For Air Travelers

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Airlines and passengers are bracing for potential delays as mandatory federal budget cuts impact the men and women who watch the skies over the United States.

Sunday was the first day that air traffic controllers were subject to furloughs due to sequestration. There were no major delays in most areas across the country. The one exception was New York, where flights at both JFK and LaGuardia had delays between 30 minutes to an hour.

That may change on Monday, as business travel picks up around the country. At the departure and arrival boards at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, heading for example to New York and elsewhere, all flights appear to be on time.

"I'm not too concerned," says ticketed passenger Sarah Meadows. "I left my house four hours ahead of my flight. I'm just taking it easy, expecting the worse, and will be glad for the best."

The furloughs will affect all 15,000 air traffic controllers. The airline industry has warned that this could end up affecting as many as 1 out of 3 airline passengers.

Those traveling are urged to get to the airport early and check with your airline to make sure that flights have not been delayed.

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