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Anthony Weiner Makes Twitter Comeback

Anthony Weiner is back — on Twitter, that is.

The disgraced politician who resigned his congressional seat after sending sexual images to female followers on the social networking site — and then lying about it — rejoined Twitter on Monday.

As of 5:50 p.m. ET, Weiner had 4,322 followers.

The move comes after a profile in The New York Times this month that focused on the married Democrat's life after he resigned in 2011 from his seat representing New York's 9th district. The Times article reported that Weiner is eyeing the mayor's race in New York.

Indeed, his first tweet Monday was a link to a policy paper he authored, titled "Keys to the City: 64 Ideas to Keep New York the Capital of the Middle Class."

The Associated Press reports:

"An NBC New York-Marist Poll last week showed about half the Democrats surveyed wouldn't even consider voting for him because of the sexting scandal. But it also showed he'd get 15 percent of the vote in a potential Democratic primary, topped only by the current front-runner, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn. About 45 percent of registered Democrats said they had a favorable impression of him, and 41 percent viewed him unfavorably."

As we reported at the time, Weiner's once-promising political career went up in flames after the sexting scandal.

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