Maryland Attorney General Advocates For Digital Privacy And Safety | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Attorney General Advocates For Digital Privacy And Safety

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Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler is using social media to help lead a national online safety campaign. The public education campaign, co-sponsored by the National Association of Attorneys General and Facebook, is designed to help teens, their parents, and other adult Internet users manage their digital privacy, and maintain personal safety while using social media.

"Where does a consumer's privacy begin on the Internet, and where does legitimate business interest of Internet commerce end," says Gansler, who is president of the NAAG. "Different people have a different place to draw that line, so we want to have a robust dialogue about where that line should be drawn."

The campaign includes a series of so-called safety team videos and tip sheets designed to clear up much of the confusion over the proper use of privacy controls — both on Facebook and across the web. The NAAG is also exploring legislative initiatives to reinforce online safety.

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