Uncle Confirms Boston Bombings Suspects' Identities | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Uncle Confirms Boston Bombings Suspects' Identities

Play associated audio
The suspect's uncle, Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., addressed reporters in a press conference on Friday, April 19, 2013.
Markette Smith
The suspect's uncle, Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., addressed reporters in a press conference on Friday, April 19, 2013.

One of the two suspects in the deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon is reported dead after a gun exchange early Friday with police in Watertown, Mass.

Officials say the uncle of the suspects confirmed that the name of the first suspect is Tamerlan Tsarnaev. He was killed in a gun battle with police in Massachusetts overnight. Police are still searching for his brother, 19-year-old Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev.

Three law enforcement officials, speaking on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the ongoing investigation, confirmed the bomb suspects were brothers.

The uncle, Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., told The Associated Press that the men lived together near Boston and have been in the United States for about a decade. They traveled to the U.S. together from the Russian region near Chechnya.

In a press conference, Tsarni urged Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to, "turn yourself in… and ask for forgiveness from the victims.”

Video: Uncle urges suspect to turn himself in.


Streaming live video by Ustream
NPR

Puerto Rico Is Sowing A New Generation Of Small Farmers

Decades of industrialization have left the island reliant on imported food. But change is coming — from government subsidies for small farmers, to classes that teach school kids how to grow food.
NPR

Puerto Rico Is Sowing A New Generation Of Small Farmers

Decades of industrialization have left the island reliant on imported food. But change is coming — from government subsidies for small farmers, to classes that teach school kids how to grow food.
WAMU 88.5

Abortion Is Back In The Spotlight In Virginia

The state's current attorney general is overturning a ruling from the previous attorney general that would have shut down most of the abortion clinics in the state, and the issue isn't just about regulations and politics. It's also about money.
NPR

Smartphones Can Be Smart Enough To Find A Parasitic Worm

If someone is infected by the Loa loa worm, taking a drug to treat river blindness could be risky. Now there's a fast way to identify the worm — by turning a smartphone into a microscope.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.