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Local Lawmakers Continue Push For Gun Reform

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Federal gun laws are of particular interest to lawmakers in the D.C. region. Maryland officials just passed a law requiring fingerprinting ahead of firearm purchases, while Virginia is known for its looser laws that critics say allow guns to be easily trafficked up the east coast. Maryland Democratic Sen. Ben Cardin says his state can't do it alone.

"A state-only background check doesn't do anywhere near like a universal background check," says Cardin.

Virginia Republican Rep. Scott Rigell opposes many of the gun amendments offered in the Senate debate. But he's sponsoring a bill that would make gun trafficking a federal crime for the first time. Rigell says now that the Senate bill has been pulled, he's hoping his bill can pick up steam.

"This legislation is needed," he says. "It's wise. It does nothing to infringe on the Second Amendment of which I'm a strong supporter."

The region's Democratic senators say they aren't deterred by the decision to pull the gun legislation, but it looks like they'll have a better chance of passing piecemeal reforms as opposed to a massive, comprehensive bill.

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