WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

No Compromise Likely On Tax Day

Play associated audio
Taxes are more of a sore point in re
Phillip Taylor: http://www.flickr.com/photos/9731367@N02/7134294207/
Taxes are more of a sore point in re

It's tax day, and President Obama's newly-released budget rekindled a debate on Capitol Hill about where tax rates should stand.

Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle agree that the complicated maze that is the U.S. tax code needs to be overhauled, but they're far apart on the details. In his budget, the president calls for raising revenue through the tax code.

Scott Rigell (R-Va.) brushes the idea aside, saying, "More spending, more taxes."

The president is also asking to trim entitlement programs, which is bringing him heat from his left. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) says the olive branch the president extended needs to be reciprocated by the GOP in the form of raising revenue.

"This is pretty dramatic, so where are you? What are you prepared to do in response other than just take it as a gift? And that's not going to work," Connolly says.

Republicans argue that questions about revenue were already answered at the start of the year. That's when party leaders agreed to raise about $600 billion in taxes. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) says that deal is now forcing the president to look at entitlements.

"Why would you cut Social Security in order to pay for tax cuts?" Scott asks. "Why don't you leave the taxes where they are and you don't have to mess with Social Security?"

Today lawmakers from both parties will fan out, railing against the current tax code, but from the sound of the debate on Capitol Hill, it doesn't look like lawmakers are getting any closer to a deal.

So next year you can likely expect the same complicated tax code you're cursing today.

NPR

'Swiss Army Man' Directors Explain The Symbolism Behind A Farting Corpse

The directors of Swiss Army Man — Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert — talk to NPR's Kelly McEvers about what inspired them to make a movie about a flatulent corpse, and the deeper meaning behind it.
NPR

Can Arnold Schwarzenegger Persuade China To Eat Less Meat?

Like the U.S., China is battling obesity and climate change. So it's urging citizens to eat less meat — and spreading the word with public service ads featuring Hollywood stars.
NPR

Kansas Votes More Money For Public Schools To Avert Shutdown

Legislators, pressured by the state Supreme Court, passed a $38 million package for the state's underfunded schools. Justices had threatened to close all public schools in Kansas after this month.
NPR

Shock, Rage And Gallows Humor: A Brexit Backlash On Social Media

Young voters had overwhelmingly voted to remain in the European Union. Now there's a flood of anger from those who accuse older generations of choosing a future they don't want.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.