At Golf's Masters, A Nice Guy Finished First | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

At Golf's Masters, A Nice Guy Finished First

Play associated audio

Search the morning-after stories about Sunday's dramatic finish of golf's Masters Tournament and one thing becomes clear. Adam Scott, the 32-year-old Australian who won after a two-hole playoff with Argentina's Angel Cabrera, seems to be one heck of a guy:

-- "He's one of the 10 nicest guys you'll ever meet," writes ESPN's Gene Wojciechowski. "Everybody — women, corporations, his native Australia — loves him. And now, at long last, so does a major."

-- "This was a great day for Australian golf," says Sydney Morning Herald sports columnist Richard Hinds. "Mostly, it was a great day for Adam Scott. A day when a nice guy finished first."

-- "Adam's a good winner," Cabrera said Sunday night. "I would have been happier if I had won, but he's a great player, I get along with him, we've played together in the President's Cup and I'm happy for him."

The other theme following Scott's win is the effect it's had in his homeland, as The Golf Channel writes:

"It is Monday in Melbourne, but all of Oz awoke to an unofficial, impromptu holiday. Australia's long Masters nightmare ended on a rainy Sunday. On a day ready-made for a duck, Adam Scott outlasted Angel 'El Pato' (The Duck) Cabrera to end the 'Aussie Duck,' the cricket term that means zero, which was the grand sum of green jackets collected before Sunday's wet and wild finish."

Scott and Cabrera finished the tournament tied at 9-under par. As for some of the other notables:

-- Another Australian, Jason Day, finished third. He was 7-under par.

-- Tiger Woods finished tied at fourth. He was 5-under par.

-- Tianlang Guan, the 14-year-old from China who's the youngest person to ever play in the Masters, finished 58th. He was 12-over par.

NPR's Tom Goldman reported about the Masters earlier for Morning Edition.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Former Basketball Player Scores As A Filmmaker

While Deon Taylor was playing professional basketball in Germany, he had an epiphany: he wanted to make movies. The self-taught director's latest film, Supremacy, was released this Friday.
NPR

Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

Sweden has the distinction of producing surströmming, one of the foulest-smelling foods in the world. More than a decade ago, NPR's Ari Shapiro tried eating it and failed. It's time for a rematch.
NPR

What Romney's Retreat Means For GOP Hopefuls

NPR's Scott Simon speaks with senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the narrowing Republican presidential field for 2016 and what we've seen so far in the first month of the new Congress.
NPR

The Infinite Whiteness Of Public Radio Voices

The hashtag #publicradiovoices, about the "whiteness" of public radio, trended on Twitter this week. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch team about the conversation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.