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Ocean City Seeks New Method To Count Tourist Population

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Ocean City officials are looking for a more accurate way to count the city's tourist population.
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Ocean City officials are looking for a more accurate way to count the city's tourist population.

It's a well-known fact that the demoflush formula Ocean City officials use to gauge how many people are coming to town in the summer is flawed.

Experts say trying to monitor population with wastewater flow and toilet flushes fails to capture all the people who are packed onto the island at a given time.

As a result, Ocean City's tourism commission is hoping to find a new way to determine visitor numbers. Some other options include room tax and food tax revenue, and of course, online data. But town officials say it's going to be tricky to find out who's coming to town and where they are coming from, because most businesses in the private sector, like hotels and rental companies, are often reluctant to give any of that information to the city or anyone else for that matter.

So while the town looks for a new method to count tourists, they are seemingly stuck with the old one, which many people just want to see flushed down the drain.

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