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Columbia Pike Streetcar Not Included In Federal Funding

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A view down Columbia Pike, where plans for a new streetcar line would have served along the busy corridor.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wfyurasko/4002624581/
A view down Columbia Pike, where plans for a new streetcar line would have served along the busy corridor.

Officials in Arlington and Fairfax counties have learned that the long-planned Columbia Pike streetcar line will not receive federal funding next year.

The Washington Post reports that the Federal Transit Administration did not list the $250 million streetcar, which would run from Fairfax County's Skyline area to Pentagon City, on its 2014 Small Starts funding list.

Federal budget cuts may be the culprit. None of the projects being funded are receiving federal money for the first time. They include the light-rail Purple Line in suburban Maryland and a light-rail line in Baltimore.

Officials had hoped for as much as $75 million dollars in federal funding for the project. The Arlington Board Chairman says the project will move forward.

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