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Cicada Invasion Expected On East, But Not On The Coast

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The cicadas are coming!
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The cicadas are coming!

Swarms of cicadas are expected to arrive sometime in the next few weeks for the first time in 17 years.

When the ground temperature reaches 64 degrees, billions of the red-eyed, prehistoric looking dark-winged cicadas will emerge from the ground and invade the east coast from North Carolina to New York.

But some parts of the east will be spared — those areas that are right on the coast.

While scientists believe that Marylanders will most definitely be hearing the annoying buzzing sound, which they note is just a mating call of the male cicadas calling out to their potential lady cicada lovers, they think the brood 2 cicadas will be staying far from the coast. That's because these cicadas, which burrow under the ground for 17 years of slumber didn't do any burrowing near the beach.

The closest areas to the beach that will likely experience the cicadas are Anne Arundel County and southern Maryland. Those living there may want to invest in some earplugs, or maybe just book a trip to the beach during the projected month-long cicada swarm.

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