Explosives Said To Be In Package Addressed To Sheriff Arpaio | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Explosives Said To Be In Package Addressed To Sheriff Arpaio

Authorities in Arizona say a package addressed to controversial Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was safely destroyed Thursday after a test for explosive residue confirmed it "contained black powder," The Arizona Republic writes.

According to the Arizona Daily Sun, the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office said late Thursday night that the device was contained in a package addressed to the sheriff at his downtown Phoenix office. The sheriff's office says Flagstaff, Ariz., police reported that the package appeared suspicious so it was x-rayed and the device detected. A bomb squad team neutralized the explosive."

Our Arpaio-related posts from the past include:

-- Sheriff Arpaio Sends Publicly Funded Deputy To Hawaii On 'Birther' Hunt

-- Justice Department Sues Ariz. Sheriff Arpaio

-- Sheriff Arpaio Violates Latinos' Rights, Justice Department Says

-- Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio Under Fire For Mishandled Sex-Crime Cases

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