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Metro To Add New Emergency Signs On Trains

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Metro officials are implementing new measures for emergency situations.
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Metro officials are implementing new measures for emergency situations.

Would a sign stop you from evacuating a Metrorail car? After an incident on the Green Line in January that saw hundreds of passengers evacuate their trains when they were stuck underground, Metro is considering updating its emergency signage.

The new sign reads: "In the event of an EMERGENCY (their emphasis, not ours), stay on the train and listen for train operator instructions. If an evacuation is necessary, be prepared for the dangers of low lighting, high voltages, uneven surfaces, and moving trains."

Metro officials say the new, glow-in-the-dark signs are only part of the plan to stop passengers from "self-evacuating," as Metro calls it. Metro General Manager Richard Sarles says the transit agency is also training operators to convey information to passengers during emergencies.

"Ultimately when we get the 7000-series cars here, the control center will be able to make direct announcements to customers to help improve that further," says Sarles.

But Sarles stresses no matter how well operators are trained, or how much new rail cars will help, Metro needs passengers to avoid following people who decide to evacuate a train on their own. He says passengers who "self-evacuated" the Green Line in January endangered themselves and delayed the return of service.

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