Grosso Calls For Change To D.C. Charter School Admissions Process | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Grosso Calls For Change To D.C. Charter School Admissions Process

Play associated audio
A task force recommended last year that D.C. charter schools be allowed to voice preference for local students.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airport/6331302/
A task force recommended last year that D.C. charter schools be allowed to voice preference for local students.

D.C. Council member David Grosso says he wants to give the city's charter schools the ability to favor neighborhood families during the admission process.

The bill "allowing" charters to use neighborhood preference in the enrollment process if they want to was introduced Tuesday.

D.C. has one of the highest concentrations of charter schools in the country, but as the demand for charters — which use lotteries and accept students from across the city — has grown, some families have complained that they've been shut out of attending schools in their own neighborhood.

Last year, the city commissioned a task force to look at the issue and it found that D.C. should not require neighborhood preference but should give schools the option to implement it.

NPR

High Tea, Afternoon Tea, Elevenses: English Tea Times For Dummies

It's easy to get overwhelmed by the English and their social tea traditions. What time does each of them take place, anyway? But don't fret. The Salt is here to offer guidance.
NPR

Communities Get A Lift As Local Food Sales Surge To $11 Billion A Year

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says local food is growing quickly from a niche market into something that's generating significant income for communities across the country.
NPR

Chris Christie Becomes 14th Republican Presidential Candidate

With New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in the race, there are now 14 Republican candidates for president. Two more are expected to join by the end of July.
NPR

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

Entrepreneurs are turning to Oak Ridge National Lab's supercomputer to make all sorts of things, including maps that are much more accurate in predicting how a neighborhood will fare in a flood.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.