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The Stuffing Flew At National Pillow Fight Day Saturday

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Hundreds took part in a stuffed melee near the Washington Monument on Saturday for National Pillow Fight Day Saturday.
Lauren Landau
Hundreds took part in a stuffed melee near the Washington Monument on Saturday for National Pillow Fight Day Saturday.

If you were walking around the National Mall this weekend, you might have seen an unusual fight break out. Instead of punches, people threw pillows.

Pillow fights are usually relegated to childhood sleepovers, but this weekend, hundreds of people gathered by the Washington Monument to take part in Pillow Fight Day, an international event that Capitol Improv has hosted in D.C. since 2009.

Group member Oscar Soto organized this year's event, and says that about 600 people came out for the annual spectacle.

"Capitol Improv is about having spontaneous moments of joy," Soto says. "Even if you don't bring a pillow today, you can still smile on your way home because you saw a crazy number of people hitting each other with pillows."

Jenna, 22, says she just wanted to let loose.

"Pillow fight kind of reminds me of when I was young, so that's why I come here," she says.

Estelle from Waldorf, Md., brought her four children. Her daughter Semaj says she will definitely come back next year.

"It's really fun. Like, you get to hit strangers and not get in trouble," she says.

That concept of  not getting in trouble was a theme for many of the younger attendees. A gang of small children gleefully attacked a man dressed as a giant banana. As people drifted away, they left with clumps of polyester stuffing on the grass, and giant smiles on their faces.


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