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Gun Control Prompts Dustup On Washington Council Of Governments

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The issue of gun control is threatening to divide the Washington Council of Governments.

Earlier this month, the council of governments, a body created and funded by local jurisdictions to promote regional cooperation, passed a resolution dealing with gun violence. It essentially adopts the recommendations of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, which include universal background checks and an assault weapons ban.

The gun control recommendations upset the representatives from several jusridictions, including Loudoun County, Virginia, Frederick County Maryland, and several other areas. In response, they threatened to withhold the dues for the council.

That in turn prompted supporters of the resolution — more than a dozen in all — to write letters to the council.

It appears as though there may be a compromise in the works. Several representives to the council from Northern Virginia are expected to introduce a new resolution next week to reconsider the recommendations from the chiefs of police and to allow jurisdictions to individually express their opinions on the issue of gun control.

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