WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Maryland House Passes Gun Control Bill

Play associated audio
Fingerprints would be required to purchase a handgun in Maryland, under the new law.
Keith Lafaille: http://www.flickr.com/photos/klafaille/6218726857/
Fingerprints would be required to purchase a handgun in Maryland, under the new law.

The Maryland House of Delegates has approved a gun-control measure proposed by Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley, which would give the state some of the toughest regulations in the nation.

The bill has a number of differences from a measure the Senate passed more than a month ago. The two chambers will have to work out the differences before the General Assembly adjourns at midnight next Monday.

Still, the House and Senate are largely in agreement on the major parts of the bill. They include a fingerprinting requirement to get a license for handguns and an assault weapons ban. The legislation also would limit magazines to 10 bullets.

Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller announced the Senate will hold two sessions today in order to take up the bill.

O'Malley proposed the bill in the aftermath of December's massacre at a Newtown, Conn., school, where a gunman killed 20 children and six adults before committing suicide.

NPR

Cult Survivor Documents 2 Decades Inside 'Holy Hell'

Will Allen directed the documentary Holy Hell, which depicts his experience as a videographer and member of The Buddhafield cult. Allen used his own footage, as well as his interviews with other former members, to make this documentary.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
NPR

GOP Congressman Defends House Zika Funding Package

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about why the House funding package is enough for now to confront the spread of the Zika virus in the U.S.
NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.