NPR : News

In Solidarity With Furloughed Workers, Obama Will Give Up 5 Percent Of His Salary

In an effort to show solidarity with furloughed federal workers, President Obama will give up 5 percent of his salary — $20,000 — this fiscal year.

CNN reports:

"Obama, whose $400,000 annual salary is set in law and can't officially be changed, will write a check made out to the U.S. treasury every month beginning in April. Since the mandatory across-the-board spending cuts went into effect March 1, his payment for last month will be paid retroactively.

"'The president has decided that to share in the sacrifice being made by public servants across the federal government that are affected by the sequester, he will contribute a portion of his salary back to the Treasury,' the [White House] official said."

Obama's move comes a day after Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced he was cutting his pay.

Because of the sequester, Pentagon employees have to take 14 days of unpaid leave. Hagel said he would give up 14 days or $10,750 of his salary.

The New York Times adds:

"The moves by the president and defense secretary may put pressure on other federal officials to follow suit. The White House would not say whether Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. would give back part of his $230,700 salary.

"On Wednesday afternoon, even as the president's decision was being reported, Senator Mark Begich, Democrat of Alaska, announced that he also would voluntarily give back part of his salary and that more than half of his staff members would have their pay cut this year even though the sequester does not include members of Congress or their aides."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

Oyster Archaeology: Ancient Trash Holds Clues To Sustainable Harvesting

Modern-day oyster populations in the Chesapeake are dwindling, but a multi-millennia archaeological survey shows that wasn't always the case. Native Americans harvested the shellfish sustainably.

WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.