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Top Stories: Surgery For Louisville Player; Tensions Stay High In Korea

Good morning.

Our early headlines:

-- Louisville Player's Surgery A Success; Leg Break Shouldn't End His Career

-- Texas On 'High Alert' After District Attorney's Killing

-- It's Almost Cicada Time! Help Radiolab Track #Swarmageddon

-- Book News: Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder, Researchers Say

-- If Something Smells Funny, Remember What Day It Is

Other stories making headlines:

-- "South Korea Vows Fast Response To North; U.S. Deploys Stealth Jets." (Reuters)

-- "Drug Maker Novartis Loses India Patent Battle." (The Associated Press)

-- In Southwestern Virginia, "3 Dead, Dozens Hospitalized" After Dense Fog Causes Multi-Vehicle Pileup. (The Roanoke Times)

-- Prosecutors Weigh Pursuing Death Penalty In Colorado Theater Killings; James Holmes Has Offered Guilty Plea For Life Sentence. (The Denver Post)

-- Atlanta Educators Indicted In Cheating Scandal To Turn Themselves In. (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

-- Play Ball! Major League Baseball Season Gets Going. (MLB.com)

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