Prosecutors Will Seek Death Penalty In Colorado Theater Shootings | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Prosecutors Will Seek Death Penalty In Colorado Theater Shootings

Rejecting James Holmes' offer to plead guilty in exchange for a life sentence, prosecutors in Colorado announced Monday that they will seek the death penalty for the young man accused of killing 12 people and injuring 58 in a mass shooting last July at a movie theater.

As Denver's KUSA-TV writes, "after a week of legal twists and turns ... Holmes could face execution if convicted."

Last week, as we reported, the 25-year-old Holmes' attorneys made the plea offer — but prosecutors called it a publicity ploy. Ben Markus of Colorado Public Radio tells our Newscast Desk that prosecutors "were left fuming that plea negotiations were made public ... violating the court's media gag order."

The Denver Post notes that "Holmes' attorneys said in their filing last week that they may pursue a mental-health defense and file numerous pre-trial motions if the case goes to trial." It adds that in court Monday, "District Attorney George Brauchler ... said his office consulted with 800 victims [and family members] before deciding to seek death for Holmes. Holmes appeared to have no reaction [to the announcement]."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'Night At The Fiestas' Spins Stories Of Faith And Family

Kirstin Valdez Quade's debut book of short fiction is inspired by her family and its long history in the "romanticized" region of northern New Mexico.
NPR

Not Just Sugary-Sweet, Hard Cider Makes A Comeback

Cider is the fastest-growing alcoholic beverage in the United States. Much of that growth is driven by big industrial producers, but smaller cider-makers are looking for a larger bite of the apple.
NPR

Nigerian President Faces Tough Reelection Campaign

Nigerians head to the polls Saturday to vote for their new president. The incumbent Goodluck Jonathan faces former military leader, Muhammadu Buhari, who says he's tough on security and corruption.
NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.