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Salisbury Voters Dissatisfied With Local Political Landscape

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Salisbury, the Eastern Shore's largest city, is finding itself at a political crossroads as its election day approaches.

"It's an embarrassment, we've become the laughing stock of the state," says Councilwoman Laura Mitchell. "When you go to Hagerstown and you say 'I'm from Salisbury,' and they say 'I'm sorry,' or you go to Crisfield and they say, 'what in the heck is wrong with your council?'"

So, it's no surprise that in a recent poll, the top thing voters want to come from Tuesday's election is people who will work together and get things done.

But while the council candidates are polar opposites when it comes to political ideologies, the mayoral candidates have been entrenched in a verbal sparring battle in public, and online.

That's because incumbent mayor Jim Ireton's challenger, Joe Albero, is the publisher of the controversial and conservative blog SalisburyNews.com, which has been accused of often being filled with racial and homophobic content.

Ireton's image isn't squeaky clean either though, as he purchased the website JoeAlbero.com to call into question his opponent's character and even his Salisbury residency.

So, while voters may want civility after the election, many people in the region worry that the harsh political climate isn't going to change all that much, regardless of who wins.


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