Lombardi Trophy Makes Appearance As Maryland Senate Approves Black Liquor Ban | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Lombardi Trophy Makes Appearance As Maryland Senate Approves Black Liquor Ban

Play associated audio

Baltimore Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith made an appearance at the Maryland Statehouse today, toting the silver Lombardi Trophy that the team won for taking Super Bowl last month.

Smith, a University of Maryland graduate, had senators, delegates, and even Gov. Martin O'Malley and two of his children briefly star struck during the visit.

"When I get my ring, I'll come back and visit you guys again," he said. "But again, thank you guys for having us, and hopefully you all enjoy seeing this, and it won't be the last time we're up here with it."

As the Senate went through its daily calendar of bills, senators briefly left the chamber to take pictures with Smith and the trophy in the Senate lounge.

When it did come to voting, the Senate approved a measure that would remove "black liquor" from the state's renewable energy portfolio. That means utilities can no longer purchase the waste byproduct burned by paper mills and count it toward the renewable energy the state mandates they buy, though Prince George's County Sen. Paul Pinsky notes the bill only pertains to "black liquor" coming from out-of-state mills.

"Some energy is cleaner than others," he says. "And for us to continue to encourage and underwrite these paper mills in other states simply doesn't make sense."

Environmentalists sought the bill saying because of its large carbon content, "black liquor" is in no way a clean or renewable energy source.

NPR

Former Basketball Player Scores As A Filmmaker

While Deon Taylor was playing professional basketball in Germany, he had an epiphany: he wanted to make movies. The self-taught director's latest film, Supremacy, was released this Friday.
NPR

Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

Sweden has the distinction of producing surströmming, one of the foulest-smelling foods in the world. More than a decade ago, NPR's Ari Shapiro tried eating it and failed. It's time for a rematch.
NPR

What Romney's Retreat Means For GOP Hopefuls

NPR's Scott Simon speaks with senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the narrowing Republican presidential field for 2016 and what we've seen so far in the first month of the new Congress.
NPR

The Infinite Whiteness Of Public Radio Voices

The hashtag #publicradiovoices, about the "whiteness" of public radio, trended on Twitter this week. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch team about the conversation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.