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D.C. Council Member Muriel Bowser To Run For Mayor

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D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser officially announced her run for mayor.
Jared Angle
D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser officially announced her run for mayor.

D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser officially launched her candidacy for mayor on Saturday.

On the front porch of her childhood home in a blue-collar part of northeast D.C., Bowser formally announced her candidacy, saying that after listening and talking to people for several months, she felt ready to run.

"What we heard loud and clear is that people wanted change they wanted more urgency more accountability in the mayor's office," Bowser said.

A native of northeast D.C., Bowser, 40, has been on the council since 2007. As a Democrat, she won a special election to replace Adrian Fenty after he was elected mayor.

Bowser has been a frequent critic of Mayor Vincent Gray, saying the city needs a leader with energy and vision. She was one of three council members to call for Gray's resignation last summer amid revelations that he was elected with the aid of $650,000 in illicit funds.

In her speech, she launched what appeared to be a backhanded barb at Gray, saying the District needs a "mayor the city can be proud of." Bowser explained what she meant after her speech.

"I think that we want a mayor that we can be proud of," Bowser said. "No matter where we go in the region, no matter where we go in the country, we want to make sure that Washington's best foot is put forward."

Mayor Gray has not indicated whether he will seek re-election  his 2010 campaign remains under federal investigation. Several other council members have talked about running as well, including Jack Evans and Tommy Wells.

Video: "I'm Running for Mayor"

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