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Two Men Sentenced For Involvement In Harry Thomas Jr. Theft

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Former council member Harry Thomas Jr. is serving 3,5 years for embezzlement.
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Former council member Harry Thomas Jr. is serving 3,5 years for embezzlement.

Two men who used their nonprofit to help cover up theft of government funds by a D.C. council member have each been sentenced to probation and community service.

Marshall Banks and James Garvin were sentenced Thursday. Each was given three years of supervised probation and ordered to perform 80 hours of community service and pay restitution.

Federal prosecutors say Banks and Garvin allowed former Council member Harry Thomas Jr. to funnel more than $300,000 in city grant money through their nonprofit to organizations controlled by Thomas. The money was intended for youth sports programs, but Thomas spent it on himself. He is serving a 3.5-year prison sentence.

Banks and Garvin were leaders of the Langston in the 21st Century Foundation, a nonprofit affiliated with the Langston Golf Course in northeast Washington.

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