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Md. Marine, Lance Cpl. William Wild, Among Seven Killed In Mortar Explosion

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Lance Cpl. William T. Wild IV, 21, of Anne Arundel, Md., died in an explosion in Hawthorne, Nev.
FreedomRemembered.com
Lance Cpl. William T. Wild IV, 21, of Anne Arundel, Md., died in an explosion in Hawthorne, Nev.

Funeral services have been scheduled for a local Marine who was one of seven people killed Monday when a mortar shell exploded during a live-fire training exercise in Nevada.

The body of 21-year-old Lance Cpl. William Taylor Wild IV will arrive at Dover Air Force Base today. Wild, who is from Anne Arundel, Md., joined the Marines in 2010 shortly after graduating from Severna Park High School in Annapolis. He was deployed twice to Afghanistan and once to Kuwait and had been scheduled to return to Afghanistan in November.

His mother Elizabeth Wild says her son always wanted to go into the military, like his father, who is a command chief in the Air Force Reserve at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

A viewing for friends and family will be held March 28 at Barranco & Sons Funeral Home in Severna Park. A memorial service will be held March 29 at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Annapolis.

Lance Corporal William Taylor Wild will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery on April 2.

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