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Washington Post To Start Charging Frequent Web Readers

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The Washington Post is feeling pressure to generate more revenue from its web audience.
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The Washington Post is feeling pressure to generate more revenue from its web audience.

The Washington Post says it will begin selling digital subscriptions this summer, asking frequent website users to pay a fee.

The Post announced plans yesterday for a metered subscription model. It will require a paid subscription after viewing 20 articles or multimedia features per month. The company hasn't announced how much it will charge.

Subscribers who pay for home delivery of the newspaper will have unlimited digital access. Also, students, teachers, government employees and military personnel will have free access at school and work.

Post Publishers say news consumers understand the high cost of maintaining top-quality newsgathering and in-depth reporting.

Washington Post Company Chairman Donald Graham has voiced worries that a paywall could reduce the size of the digital audience.

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