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Top Stories: Pope's Pledge To Protect Poor; Dueling Claims In Syria

Good morning.

Our early headlines:

-- For Pope Francis, A Simple Mass And A Call To Protect The Poor

-- Accident During Live-Fire Exercise Kills At Least Seven Marines In Nevada

-- Dueling Claims In Syria After Unconfirmed Reports About Chemical Weapons

-- Housing Rebound Continues: Starts Rose 0.8 Percent In February

-- Cyprus Lawmakers Could Vote On Unpopular Bailout Plan

-- Book News: Honolulu, Chicago Campaign To Host Obama's Presidential Library

-- World Baseball Classic's All-Caribbean Showdown Is A Winner Either Way

Other stories in the news:

-- Police Say Former University Of Central Florida Student "Was Planning Campus Attack." (WMFE)

-- On Trip To Mideast, Obama Hopes To "Ignite Stalled Peace Talks." (Morning Edition)

-- "Poll Tracks Dramatic Rise In Support For Gay Marriage." (ABC News)

-- It's Primary Day In South Carolina For Former Gov. Sanford And Stephen Colbert's Sister. (The State)

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