Commuters May Finally Be Able To Catch An S Line Bus | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Commuters May Finally Be Able To Catch An S Line Bus

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At 16th St and U St, riders face lines every day to get on the S bus line.
Kishan Putta
At 16th St and U St, riders face lines every day to get on the S bus line.

Update: Metro has confirmed that additional S line bus service from 7:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. will begin on Monday, March 25.

Original Story: Additional morning rush hour service is coming to Metro's busiest bus corridor in Washington after the Dupont Circle Advisory Neighborhood Commission took commuters' complaints to the transit authority.

The S bus line on 16th Street NW, a historic gateway into downtown D.C., is struggling to meet ridership demand. Buses are often packed before reaching the southern stretch of the route and cannot squeeze additional passengers aboard, leaving rush hour commuters waiting in long lines at bus stops in Columbia Heights, Adams Morgan, and near Dupont Circle. Some commuters eventually give up and hop in taxis.

"I went out to the bus stops and I saw taxicabs pull up to the long lines, seeing a business opportunity and offering to take them downtown, because the buses weren't working for our city," says Kishan Putta, a commissioner on the Dupont Circle ANC.

Groundswell of community response to S line problems

Putta tried to solicit commuters' concerns on Facebook and Twitter, but drew his largest response the old fashioned way: he put up posters at bus stops asking commuters to contact him.

"We took those stories and those complaints to Metro and they agreed to meet us," in January, Putta says. "They had to admit in public this is a big problem."

Putta provided the following example of a typical commuter complaint about crowding on the S line.

"Just this week it has taken me 45-50 minutes to get from 16th & V to 14th & I, and anywhere from 4 to 6 buses have passed the stop each morning because they are too crowded to accept any more passengers," said one complaint.

Metro has been aware of S line bus crowding for years, but its efforts haven't kept up with growing ridership. In 2009 the S9, which makes limited stops on 16th Street NW, was added during morning and evening rush hours to alleviate crowding.

"Bus ridership remains strong, especially with all the new residents moving into the district," says Metro spokesman Dan Stessel. "There are new residential units along this corridor and so we want to make sure we are providing service for the folks who want it."

These are the details we know so far:

  • An additional bus will arrive at 16th Street and Harvard NW every 12 minutes from 7:30 to 9:15 a.m. weekday mornings.
  • A total of nine additional trips will go down 16th Street, then left on I St to 14th Street.
  • Then the buses will head back to Columbia Road NW.
  • The extra capacity will carry between 400 and 500 commuters on a busy morning.

 

"This issue didn't just crop up two months ago. We've been working on the S line and broader issues related to the S line for more than a year now," Stessel says. "That said, the relationship we've had over the last two months with the ANC has been nothing but constructive." 

Still no answer to 16th Street traffic

Putta concedes that while the additional morning rush hour bus service will help move commuters south on 16th Street, the District faces a bigger task in mitigating the corridor's notorious traffic congestion.

"As with a lot of these long-term solutions, you would need to do a transition so that you would hopefully get less people driving. And of course, the physical limitations of the road are definitely an issue," says Putta, referring to the possibility of creating a bus-only lane on 16th Street during rush hour.

Metro's Stessel says the transit authority is working on a solution.

"It's an ongoing dialogue that we have not only with DDOT but with all of the jurisdictions," Stessel says. "A major milestone will be achieved about a year from now when we launch what is true BRT (bus rapid transit) in the region for the first time. That will be on the Virginia side of the river in partnership with Alexandria and Arlington."

The Route 1 Transitway will run buses every six minutes in dedicated lanes from Braddock Road in Arlington north to Crystal City.

"We hope that will spark other jurisdictions to consider, if not true BRT, perhaps traffic signal prioritization or more bus lanes," says Stessel. "From a public policy perspective, if you have a vehicle that has 50 people in it, that really should get priority over a car that has one person in it."

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