Former Democratic Rep. Artur Davis Rumored To Be Eyeing Virginia House Seat | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Former Democratic Rep. Artur Davis Rumored To Be Eyeing Virginia House Seat

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Former Democratic Rep. Artur Davis used his time at the Conservative Political Action Conference to chastise Republicans for losing the 2012 election.

Davis, who is rumored to be eyeing a House seat in northern Virginia, just switched parties in the past year. But he spoke as if he's been a Republican his entire life as he urged his conservative audience to fine-tune their message.

"So we just spent a billion dollars more than our side has ever had, to tell its case," he says. "And for all that money, we couldn't find the language to tell enough Americans why our conservative politics and policies would work in their lives."

In critiquing his new party, Davis brought up issues that have taken a backseat at CPAC, like student loans, low working wages, and poverty.

"The first Republicans in my lifetime who didn't have the self-confidence to talk about how our policies reduce the poverty and lift the poor out of dependency, the first Republicans since World War II, who didn't seem to get that in this competitive world education is a part of promoting the common defense."

Davis' rebuke was well received; he walked off the stage to a standing ovation.

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