New Device Developed To Curb Texting While Driving | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

New Device Developed To Curb Texting While Driving

Play associated audio

A tech company is pushing a new product as a way to stop young drivers from using their cell phones when they're supposed to be paying attention to the road.

Amanda Kloehr says she is one of the lucky ones — lucky she is still breathing at all.

"I have 36 plates and 48 screws on the right side of my face," Kloehr says. "My right eye is a prosthetic, my ankle was snapped, and I had to learn how to re-walk."

And when during a news conference she showed photos of what she looked like after a 2008 car crash that nearly killed her, most people in the room cringed. Some started to cry. The 24-year-old woman says she was driving distracted, fiddling with her cell phone, when she slammed into the back of a truck in Virginia. 

Kloehr spoke on behalf of the tech company Origo, which is marketing a device that works like an ignition lock: you can't start your car until your phone is in the Origo docking station, and if you pull it out while driving, it emits a piercing electronic screech.

In 2010, nearly 3,100 people were killed in crashes in the U.S. involving a distracted driver, according to federal data. Origos's device sells for $279 dollars, plus another $125 to have it installed.

NPR

Wounded Bull-Runner: 'If You Run Long Enough, You Get Gored'

Bill Hillmann, a writer from Chicago, contributed to the book Fiesta: How to Survive the Bulls of Pamplona. He was gored at this year's running of the bulls in that city, but says he plans to return.
NPR

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

We thought you'd get a kick out of seeing how the four teams in the final World Cup matches stack up in global health and development.
NPR

Congress' Latest Death Match Involves A Bank You've Never Heard Of

The business lobby is pushing hard for the survival of the Export-Import Bank, which has supported U.S. exports for 80 years. Some House GOP leaders, though, think it's time to kill the bank.
NPR

Looking For Free Sperm, Women May Turn To Online Forums

Bypassing commercial sperm banks, thousands are logging on to websites where women can connect with men at no cost. Anecdotes abound, but the scope of the unregulated activity is unclear.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.