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Press Foundation Posts Leaked Audio Of Pfc. Bradley Manning

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In this June 25, 2012 file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, right, is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md.
(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
In this June 25, 2012 file photo, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, right, is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md.

The Freedom of the Press Foundation posted a 68-minute recording of testimony from Pfc. Bradley Manning explaining why he released U.S. secrets to WikiLeaks.

The audio was recorded during Manning's Feb. 28 pretrial hearing at Fort Meade, Maryland.

WAMU and other news organizations reported the facts of his statement made during the hearing, but neither reporters nor spectators were allowed to record the proceedings.

The foundation was co-founded by former military analyst Daniel Ellsberg who released the so-called Pentagon Papers back in 1971. Ellsberg claims he doesn't know who made the recording, but says his group felt it was time for the public to hear Manning's voice. Manning has pleaded guilty to 10 minor charges, but still faces trial in June for 12 other counts including aiding the enemy.

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