International Convention Moves To Limit Shark 'Finning' Trade | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

International Convention Moves To Limit Shark 'Finning' Trade

Delegates to an international species conservation conference held in Bangkok, Thailand, this week have agreed to limit the trade shark fins and meat.

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that government representatives to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, have agreed to put the porbeagle, oceanic whitetip, three kinds of hammerhead shark and two kinds of manta ray on its Appendix II list, which places restrictions on fishing, but still allows limited trade.

Joyce says "conservation groups have been trying for years to curtail the widespread killing of sharks for their meat and for shark fin soup," which is considered a delicacy in China and elsewhere in Asia.

The listing must be confirmed in a formal vote this week. It follows a failed attempt last week to list the polar bear as endangered, Joyce says.

According to The Independent newspaper, scientists estimate that almost 100 million sharks are caught each year and since they are slow growing and slow to reproduce, they are especially vulnerable to overfishing.

"Although some regions, including the European Union, have banned shark finning, commercial fishing for fins, meat, liver oil, cartilage and other body parts is largely unregulated in much of the world, conservationists warn. Some countries have been reluctant to include marine species, which can generate large revenues, in the treaty that regulates or bans international trade in wildlife. The shark fin business is worth an estimated [$475 million] a year."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

A Historic Backdrop Frames Forbidden Love In 'The Paying Guests'

Sarah Waters' latest novel, set in 1920s London, examines the moral consequences of passion. Though slightly too long, this book brings the past to life with exquisite clarity.
NPR

Before You Take A Bite Of That Mushroom, Consider This

Guess what scientists found lurking inside a common-looking packet of supermarket porcini? Three entirely new species of fungi. That's what happens when you DNA sequence your dinner.
NPR

Move To Curb U.S. Corporate Tax Dodges Could Delay Reform

Business and consumer groups say Congress needs to reform taxes, but few expect change soon. In fact, Treasury's tweaks to tax law may diminish the political will to address broader tax reform.
WAMU 88.5

Montgomery County's Drones Are Ready, But Policy Isn't

The county government has purchased four drones for use by its fire department and innovation office, but bureaucracy is keeping them grounded for now.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.