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FBI Fields 35 Proposals For New HQ

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The FBI is looking to relocate from the J. Edgar Hoover building in downtown Washington D.C.
Chirag Shah: http://www.flickr.com/photos/chirag_dshah/89537676/
The FBI is looking to relocate from the J. Edgar Hoover building in downtown Washington D.C.

The FBI is looking for a new home, and plenty of places are rolling out the welcome mat. Federal officials say they received 35 proposals from developers and communities interested in hosting a new headquarters for the FBI.

The agency wants to move out of its current headquarters at the J. Edgar Hoover Building on Washington's Pennsylvania Avenue.

D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray is pushing for Poplar Point, a 110 acre site recently transferred from the federal government to the District. It's got walking trails, biking trails, it's next to the Anacostia River and it's near a Metro station.

The House must still approve the relocation and guidelines for a new facility. Senate leaders requested that the complex be within two miles of a Metro station and within 2.5 miles of the Capital Beltway.

The FBI estimates that a new headquarters would cost $1.2 billion, and is not likely to be completed until 2020 at the earliest.

Sites are expected to be considered in Northern Virginia, including a site in Springfield, Va. Prince George's County is proposing a site near the Greenbelt Metro station.

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