WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Early Voting And Offshore Wind Power Advance In Maryland Senate

Play associated audio
The Maryland Senate advanced the early voting and offshore wind bills.
Robert Williams (http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwillia532/6023529955/)
The Maryland Senate advanced the early voting and offshore wind bills.

A bill to expand wind power off Maryland's Eastern Shore moved forward, even though opposing Republicans weren't done offering amendments trying to change the measure.

Senate President Mike Miller said he would allow more amendments when the chamber takes it up for a final vote, possibly Friday morning. Miller supports offshore wind, though his new energy source preference is nuclear power.

"Nuclear power is very costly," says Miller. "It's a lot of jobs in my district, and we have a foreign investor willing to go forward. But the federal government is not willing to step up at this time. Wind is the next best source that's available to us at this time. And we have the ocean on our border, and we need to take advantage of it."

Republicans like E.J. Pipken of the Eastern Shore say offshore wind is too expensive for Maryland ratepayers, and too unreliable.

"The wind doesn't blow in August in Ocean City," says Pipken. "That's when we need the power the most. That's where we're putting windmills."

The full Senate has never taken a vote on the measure during the past three years offshore wind has been pushed by Gov. Martin O'Malley.

The Senate also advanced, in the more traditional manner, a bill that would add early voting days in Maryland. That measure also allows for same-day registration at early voting centers. Republican Alan Kittleman tried unsuccessfully to force voters, seeking same-day registration without a picture ID, to use a provisional ballot.

"I think that if you come in with a BG&E bill, I think that's fine and you're going to vote three weeks later," says Kittleman. "But to vote that same day, how in the world do they know that you're that person? You have nothing that shows you're that person."

Senators did add one change allowing rural parts of the state, namely in the western Maryland panhandle, to have more early voting centers to cut down on the distance some people travel to vote.

NPR

Credibility Concerns Overshadow Release Of Gay Talese's New Book

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Paul Farhi of the Washington Post about Gay Talese's new book, The Voyeur's Hotel. The credibility of the book, which follows a self-proclaimed sex researcher who bought a hotel to spy on his guests through ventilator windows, has been called into question after Farhi uncovered problems with Talese's story.
NPR

Amid Craft Brewery Boom, Some Worry About A Bubble — But Most Just Fear Foam

Fueled by customers' unquenchable thirst for the next great flavor note, the craft beer industry has exploded like a poorly fermented bottle of home brew.
NPR

White House Documents Number Of Civilians Killed In U.S. Drone Strikes

The Obama administration issued a long awaited report Friday, documenting the number on civilians who have been accidentally killed by U.S. drone strikes. Human rights activists welcome the administration's newfound transparency, though some question whether the report goes far enough.
NPR

Tesla 'Autopilot' Crash Raises Concerns About Self-Driving Cars

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is investigating a fatal crash involving a Tesla car using the "autopilot" feature. NPR's Robert Siegel talks to Alex Davies of Wired about the crash and what it means for self-driving car technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.