Bin Laden's Son-In-Law Arrested, Brought To U.S.

A son-in-law of Osama bin Laden has been extradited to the United States and could appear in court as soon as Friday, say sources familiar with the case.

The man, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, may be best known for his appearance in videos. He was sitting next to bin Laden when the al-Qaida leader took credit for the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. He has been in videos advocating more violence against the U.S. And he has been wanted by U.S. law enforcement for some time.

Ghaith was arrested in Turkey in February, the sources say, after he entered that country from Iran under a false passport. Turkey then said it would deport him to Kuwait, via Jordan. He was intercepted by U.S. officials in Jordan last week and then brought to the U.S.

Sources say Ghaith is now in Manhattan.

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., tells The Associated Press that Ghaith's arrest is a sign that "definitely, one by one, we are getting the top echelons of al-Qaida. I give the (Obama) administration credit for this: it's steady and it's unrelenting and it's very successful."

Bin Laden was killed by U.S. Navy SEALs in May 2011 during a raid on the compound where he had been living in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

(Dina Temple-Raston is NPR's counterterrorism correspondent.)

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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